Adam West – Bat Signal Tribute 

June 18, 2017

Just because. 

http://io9.gizmodo.com/the-bat-signal-shined-in-los-angeles-to-honor-adam-west-1796166502


ProDOS32 MB Image Loaded with Stuff

June 16, 2017

Screen Shot 2017-06-15 at 9.34.37 PM

I downloaded the PRODOSMASTER32.2mg hard drive image created by John M. Holmes Jr. and posted on his DropBox site via the FaceBook Apple II Enthusiasts Forums (search on ProDOS32). The image is a ProDOS image and boots to ProDOS 2.4.1. The disk contains AppleWorks 4 and 5, many Utilities and many many Games.

I loaded it into to Virtual II and proceeded to exercise the various launchers, utilities, plus games like Beer Run, Moon Patrol and Donkey Kong. In running AppleWorks 5.1 I had to reset all the Directory specifications. This included the AW.Inits, TimeOut Applications and the Data Disk directory. The best and really only way to accomplish this is through the Other Activities menu item in AppleWorks 5. In AppleWorks 2 or 3 this only allowed you to set the Data Disk path.

In AppleWorks 4 and 5 you can set numerous paths. In this case: /PRODOSMASTER2MG/APPLEWORKS/AW5/Data or TimeOut or AW.Inits/

Other Activities

Select Standard Settings for AppleWorks

Options – for entering proper path


Also, if you exercise the print Name and Address Macro from within AppleWorks 5.1 you see John’s address printed out. I could not find a way to update this NAME.ADDRESS.bin file from with the AppleWorks 5.1 program or TimeOut options. So I replaced the file with my copy of the file from another disk image. It worked fine. The NAME.ADDRESS is created when you actually install AppleWorks 5.

In the Games Directory I just figured out I can jump to the proper game alphabetically by typing the first letter of its name, e.g. P for Pacman. There are so many games this is handy on each reboot. With the PacMan.Atari game it is best to select Joystick and then set the Virtual II emulator to used Arrows as Joystick.


SoftDisk #146 Star Trek Crossword Puzzles

June 3, 2017

The SoftDisks for Apple IIs starting around number 73 had themed crossword puzzles. One of my favorites is the Star Trek crossword puzzles here on SoftDisk number 146. It’s too bad the SoftDisks are not in the Public Domain.




I think I have #1 Across figured out.😀


To.Paint for AppleWorks 3, 4, 5.1 from Beagle Brothers

May 25, 2017

TimeOut Paint comes with the SuperFonts disks. It allows you to insert graphics into your AppleWorks file. The disk comes with a number of sample pictures like the picture I’ll post here. I’ve added text [ VintageGeek ] to the Picture as that’s one of the tools that comes with To.Paint. In the other picture you’ll see how the picture insert is done. It’s the same manner as the SuperFonts.

Printed with 3 different fonts and the picture. Plus italics, shadow and outline.


SuperFonts for AppleWorks from Beagle Brothers 

May 25, 2017

Running on Virtual IIe Emulator in AppleWorks 3 and AppleWorks 5.1.

Using PickFonts to insert in the AppleWorks document. Venice.14.

Actual PDF output from Virtual IIe.

Font disks.

These are Printing to Screen output.  


IIGS Sweet16 Emulator for macOS – How to Print

May 19, 2017

I’ve been trying to figure out how to print from the IIGS Sweet16 emulator for a while now. I went through the user guide and finally figured out all the little pieces I need to have in place. The following are a few graphics of the pieces. Many of the snapshots are taken directly from the user guide. I have included the link to the user guide for your reference.
—– In short when you print from the IIGS Sweet16 emulator it actually creates a PDF file and calls the macOS Preview app on your main macOS computer and creates a PDF. You’ll see it run as it’s converting a postscript. http://www.sheppyware.net/downloads/downloads-mac/files/Sweet16%20User%20Guide.pdf
The first snapshot is all things in place as finished product: 1) IIGS Emulator ruining AppleWorksGS 2) the same document in PDF format in The macOS Preview App 3) the Sweet16 Disks box which tells you what disks are loaded in the IIGS.

The example below is an AppleWorks 5.1 file imported into AppleWorksGS. My MacBook Pro is running macOS Sierra.


Getting there: here are some extracts from the manual. The Sweet16Tools is a Dropdown from Setup on the Sweet16 Menu Bar. Now, open the ReadMeFirst, as I believe it has the most succinct set of instructions on how to get things correctly installed.


Sweet16 Tools Version 3.0.1 Copyright 2006-2013 Eric Shepherd & F.E. Systems

The files on this disk image, once used properly, enable special features inside Sweet16. 

Printing Support

  1. To install, you need to drag the SweetPrinter file to the System:System.Setup folder on your IIGS boot disk
  2. Install the LaserWriter driver from the System 6.0.1 disks. Usually System Tools disk #2
  3. Now, run the SweetLWPatch utility. When asked, select the “LaserWriter” driver file from your boot disk’s System:Drivers folder and click the Open button. This utility creates a copy of the LaserWriter driver with certain patches needed to support Sweet16’s printing capabilities. 
  4. Save the driver with a new name (SweetPrinter is recommended, but it doesn’t matter). Once you’ve done so and have returned to the Finder or whatever program launcher you use, 
  5. Restart your emulated Apple IIgs.
  6. Once you’ve done so, you can use the DC Printer control panel, assuming you’ve put it in the cdevs folder, to select the “SweetPrinter” driver. Future printing will be done using this driver, and will result in opening the print job in the macOS Preview app, from which you can print the file or save it in PDF format. 

By the way, after completing the install and reboot I opened the ReadMeFirst file in Teach and was able to print it to a PDF in Preview.

LaserWriter driver copied from System Tools Disk#2 to the Drivers Folder.

Direct Connect control panel in CDevs.

LaserWriter driver and the created SweetPrinter driver after running SweetLWPatch program.

The Menu to actually print through to the Preview App.

Below are some of the snapshots from the manual.


AppleWorks 5.1, 4.3 3.01, 2. No-Slot Clock in Virtual IIe plus TimeOut Apps Yearly Calendar 

May 17, 2017

I’ve managed to install four versions of AppleWorks on my OmniDisk in Virtual II Emulator. I’ve also been testing various TimeOut Applications. AppleWorks 5.1 and 4.3 come with many of the TimeOut functions built in. So I’ve been trying lots of the other add-ons published separately to see what is out there. Here is a link to lots of the stuff:

ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/images/productivity/integrated/appleworks/timeout/


Here is my OmniDisk 32 MB HardDrive in Virtual II. This Super Selector is a pretty nice text based Launcher. It has Quick-Keys you can set up. You can see Closed-Apple-F is for AppleWorks 5.1. There’s an extra step to setting up the Quick-Keys which isn’t noted in the process. Easy, once you know. I’ll post the Steps at the End.


In Virtual II Emulator I always had the No-Slot Clock selected but I wasn’t seeing the time-stamps showing up on files. Then a light bulb finally went on. I had to Install it on the Boot Disk and run the Setup. So I downloaded the ProDOS version:  

https://ultimateapple2.com/forums/forum/main-forum/no-slot-clock-goes-under-the-ram-chip/250-no-slot-clock-software

https://mirrors.apple2.org.za/Apple%20II%20Documentation%20Project/Chips/SMT%20No-Slot%20Clock/Manuals/No-Slot%20Clock%20-%20User%27s%20Manual.pdf




Time stamps finally showing up.


Also, I grabbed the TimeOut TO.ABOUT.TIME application (from link at top) because it has yearly calendars for every year. It turns out there are 14 types of years. The Calendar.A turns out to be 2017.

I’ve been working with the Super Selector v3.2.2 on the Hard Drive (Virtual and Real) on the Apple IIe. I wanted to change some of the “Quick-Keys” which startup  programs you assign to them.  It turns out the entry of the information is easy. However, the saving  your entry process is has an extra step not noted in the screens process. Quick-Key Setup.

1) You use the Open-Apple-Q to bring up the Menu of Quick-Keys.  

2) From there you select the Quick-Key you’d like to change by scrolling to it
and hitting the Return Key. This brings up the edit menu for that item.  

3) You change the Title of the Quick-Key on the top line and the path on the
second line.  

4) Then you select Open-Apple-A to Accept.
[ the Accept box disappears ]

5) Lastly, you a) hit esc to go back to the Main Menu b) Then type Open-
Apple-O to go to the Options Screen and then c) you save permanently with Open-Apple-S. You’ll see the box blink a little.

On the Save screen there are other configuration options. See below:

[ Super Selector 3.2.2 ].

Not only are you saving the Quick-Key you just Setup, but also the location. In my case I run from a Hard Drive (OmniDisk in the Emulator as well as SCSI Drive in real lle) so Slot 7 Drive 1 is the selection. When you use Open-Apple-S to Save the Config you’ll see the Box with “Save Copy” change to semi-solid background until save is completed.