FloppyEmu with New 16 MHz TransWarpGS v1.1 and CFFA3000

December 23, 2018

Just expanding on my TransWarpGS post from 4 days ago.

Having a little fun. I plugged my FloppyEMU into the IIGS that runs via the new TransWarpGS v1.1 and boots from CFFA3000. Icons on left are the FloppyEMU.

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CFFA3000 Drive on IIGS plus Large Volume GSOS Installation Kit

December 19, 2018

I just got around to installing my CFFA3000 Card in my IIGS Rom03 as I also just received my new TransWarpGS from ReactiveMicro (separate blog post). The focus of this post is the Large Volume Installation Kit. You really “Level Up” dramatically with this kit. It’s worth every penny.

The link to the CFFA site:

http://dreher.net/?s=projects/CFforAppleII&c=projects/CFforAppleII/main.php

The link to large volume installation kit which describes it’s contents and features in detail. Below the link is a snapshot of that page.

https://www.ebluejay.com/ads/item/5548729

This kit is worth every cent. With the included CF Card, the USB drive and the USB Cable you’re all set. No hunting around for things.

Once you increase the number of SmartPort Assignments (just a menu change) you’ll see the HFS Drives, and be able to assign the other images. Here are a few pictures of that effort. Most of the images are from Alex Lee’s IIGS site. But a couple are images I made in my Virtual II Emulator.

http://www.whatisthe2gs.apple2.org.za/

The Santa Trashcan icon is on the System.Addons image on Alex’s site.

Here is the OMNIDISK image I made in my Virtual II Emulator. You’ll see all the AppleWorks versions. I copied these over to one of the CF card “hard drives”.

Below are pictures from the Kits Setup and Installation Guides.


New TransWarpGS 16 MHz from ReactiveMicro

December 19, 2018

The new 16 MHz TransWarpGS finally arrived in time for Christmas. I pre-ordered it back in May. It is amazingly fast, to say the least. Those games that require lots of graphics (Jack Nicklaus Golf), and publishing (GraphicWriter3) really snap. Also need to mention HyperStudio and HyperCard. Wow. The first picture shows TWGS Reporter details. Note: this IIGS uses the Scart HDMI connector on my Toshiba LCD. i have other blog entries on setting the Scart and Cable.

Here’s the product picture.

https://www.reactivemicro.com/shop/

Here’s the old cpu before removal.

I used two different length flat head screwdrivers to wedge it out. The long one working from the front of the IIGS and the short one from within the machine. I used the eraser as Lever support with the short screwdriver to help avoid slipping and hitting the motherboard. It worked amazingly well.

Here are the manual photos for plugging in the fan.

Turned it on, ran the self tests. That was it. Referenced the manual from ReactiveMicro wiki site throughout.

Removed the fan temporarily to see the oscillator.

It inserted quite readily.

Diversi-Tune playing.

Here is the setup, including the new CFFA3000 Card and the GGLABS Memory Card.

I discuss the CFFA installation and fun in the next blog entry (coming soon).

End.


More MouseDesk 2 – Apple IIGS this time

November 26, 2018

My previous post for MouseDesk 2 dealt with the IIe and Laser. This post has some pictures and details on my experience on the Apple IIGS. The previous post was on April 1, 2018.

The IIGS is a Rom01 with a TransWarpGS, and for this experience a 3.5 with a FloppyEmu attached. In the final couple pictures I boot GSOS from the SCSI Drive and then invoke MouseDesk 2. [ It’s really rather redundant, but fun to see ].

Above I tried to run AppleWorks with Pinpoint Accessories but pathname was too long for AppleWorks / Pinpoint to deal with.

So,

Here I started PublishIT4 and ran with no issues.

Below, I booted from the SCSI Drive. It’s partitions are Geek1 and Geek2.

The FloppyEmu partitions are all the other disk icons. Note, they are represented by 3.5″ floppy images. I suppose since the FloppyEmu boots off the SmartPort.

From the desktop I drilled down in GSharddrive and started up the GSOS App called Write Away. When I exited Write Away back to the GSOS Desktop. I was able to SAVE the document I created in Write Away.


Jack Nicklaus Golf for Apple IIGS

August 23, 2018

Publishing this now. I thought I published this ages ago.

http://www.whatisthe2gs.apple2.org.za/jack-nicklaus-greatest-18-holes-of-major-championship-golf

You really need a TransWarpGS or ZipGSX to play this because the screen draws are horribly slow. Plus a hard drive like today’s equivalents, MicroDrive Turbo or CFFA. How Accolade could have put this out is beyond me. Of course, with today’s emulators it can be fun.

There’s a reason they call them Championship Courses. They are very difficult. Lots of out of bounds and the greens can be incredibly difficult. What makes the greens tough is you can’t see the slope of the green after the hole itself. The game tells you degree of break and up hill or downhill to the hole, but that’s all. I’ve missed more than one hole by less than a foot and have the ball roll 10-15 feet by or even off the green. And they tend to have the pins in the center of multiple slopes. Try it!

These pictures were taking on my Toshiba Monitor with HDMI connection via Scart adapter. That is why they are widescreen shots.

Here’s regular screen dimensions.


Applied Engineering 5.25 Apple Drive

August 8, 2018

Picked this up and it works very well. No issues with it attached to Laser128 or Franklin Ace 500.


FASTChip //e for Apple IIe – Accelerator Card from A2Heaven

December 17, 2017

Just installed my FASTChip //e In italics are the notes from the a2heaven.com website. Links to website and my videos are below.

Update May 31, 2018: I recently found my 5.25 pfs:Write disks and thought I’d try it with the FastChip//e and the DuoDisk drive. Interesting to watch.

May 31, 2018  I updated the file again today and then ran Spell Check or ‘Proofing’ as pfs:Write calls it. With the FastChip//e set to 8.3 MHz (random speed selection) the Dictionary disk never stopping spinning in drive one. Data disk in drive two. The document was over five pages long and the spell checking flew. The disks and screen never really stopped and barely slowed down as it flew through the document addressing probably over 1000 words. There were proofs required along the way since there were some misspellings, but also terms, like FastChip//e. Many of these needed to be added to the Personal Dictionary. It was fun to perform this check. Lastly, the word replacement special effect of pfs:write where it erases the word from right to left and types in the new word, was nearly instantaneous. 

November 22, 2017

I’ve been running a tests of PublishIt v4 startup time on the Apple //e with the FastChip//e.

*With the FastChip//e set at 10 MHz and running PublishIt from the SCSI drive it took 8 seconds to load.

*With the FastChip//e running at 1.0 MHz running from the SCSI drive it took 25 seconds.

*With the FastChip//e running at 1.0 MHz and PublishIt v4 running from a UniDisk 3.5 disk connected the Liron Controller Card in the //e it took 53 seconds to load. [ Note: The Apple //e has a RamWorks8M card made from a2Heaven. This card uses current day technology so it must provide some additional advantage when loading the fonts, et al into memory upon startup. The only way to see the difference would be for me to uninstall the RamWorks8M and reinstall the 1986 RamWorks 1M card by Applied Engineering. At the end of this post are links to YouTube videos of the above.

From the a2heaven website:

The FASTChip //e accelerates the Apple //e™ by replacing the on-board microprocessor with a much faster one. Because the memory on the Apple //e™ can only run at a 1 MHz speed maximum, faster memory (SRAM) must be provided to increase performance and allow the 65C02/65C816 CPU to run at full speed. To do this, the FASTChip //e contains 512KB/1024KB of fast SRAM memory. The clever design allows the acceleration of programs running in both main and auxiliary memory. The additional FASTChip //e memory can emulate both 192/448 KB fast RamWorks  compatible RAM and 256/512 KB fast RamFactor (slinky) compatible RAM.

FASTChip //e features

  • Easy to install card, installable in slot 1-7 of the Apple //e™, or Enhanced //e.
  • Does not mechanically interfere with the 80 column card in slot 3.
  • 65C02/65C816 microprocessor running at a clock rate of more than 16 MHz .
  • External Hardware Control Panel with controls and LED display.
  • CPU frequency can be changed real-time via rotary knob (0.2Mhz to 16.6Mhz).
  • Stop/Pause and Status buttons for easy control.
  • 4 digits x 7 segment LED display.
  • Built in 192/448 KB fast RamWorks compatible RAM.
  • Built in 256/512 KB fast RamFactor (Slinky) compatible RAM.
  • Low power design for cool operation.
  • Acceleration of programs running in both main and auxiliary memory.
  • Compatible with most interface and expansion cards for the Apple II/IIe.
  • Transparent operation with all Apple II software.
  • An easily accessed built-in software control panel lets you control processor speed, memory, joystick, speaker sound quality and many other options.

Picture above courtesy of Jorma Honkanen.

My actual //e Setup with FastChip//e, RamWorks8M card and SDFloppy II installed.

FastChip//e videos of PublishIT version 4 at 10 Mhz. A program essentially unusable on a IIe at 1 MHz.

[Note: I’m running PublishIt from a SCSI drive, not a floppy, unidisk 3.5, or SDFloppy, although programs ran fine from all three devices. But obviously SCSI is the fastest ] : unless you have a CFFA or MicroDrive Turbo.

https://youtu.be/njtTLMxZF-E

https://youtu.be/E0hqbxmvMJ4

http://www.a2heaven.com/webshop/index.php?rt=product/product&product_id=147

http://www.a2heaven.com/webshop/resources/pdf_document/18/82/c.pdf